Wednesday, January 21, 2015

What's the best way to break in my wrap?

Wash it.
Most new wraps arrive to you in loom state. That's a fancy way of saying you need to wash them to tighten the weave and set it before wrapping, otherwise you risk thread shifting and other nasties. 
Check the care instructions, as different blends prefer different treatment. 
Wool particularly requires hand washing, as agitating the fibres may cause felting and then your wrap is no longer safe to be used as a baby carrier. 

Choose a gentle detergent- (a) liquid and (b)no optical brighteners. Soap nuts are great. No fabric softeners, thanks. 


Dry. 
Drape over your line or a clotheshorse. 

Iron.
Not COMPULSORY, but a really good idea. Very textured wraps will benefit from a once-over and even a relatively smooth jacquard likes a good press. Linen requires ironing to avoid permacreasing in rails. 

Some wraps are going to be just fine to throw on about now. Actually, all of them are. If you have an all-cotton Kokadi, girasol, Didymos, Yaro, Fidella, silver lining, oscha, little frog... you're probably good to go. If you feel your wrap is still a bit crunchy or you have a more supportive blend (linen/hemp can be a little beastly!), you might want to do a little more work before you toss baby up and start yanking on bits. 

I like to loop and twist. I put the middle round the banister/table leg/bedframe, hold ends and twist until wrap is knitted up on itself. Leave for a bit, shake out and twist other way. You're just loosening the fibres, so don't go too crazy. 

If you have a couple sling rings, run your wrap through - great for toning the arms...

Braid and belt. Basically, braid your wrap up and then whack vigorously against floor. if you have floorboards, make sure there aren't any sharp bits that might snag. GREAT anger management strategy, not good if you have nervous pets. My pug is not a fan. 

Sit on it. I generally do this in the car, because I'm short. I like the extra elevation. Also, the hot car really likes helping me with hemp and linen softening. 

Iron it again. 
I'm not a fan of ironing, so I'll skip this and go straight to hammocking. 


Hammocking is brilliant after braiding and belting. Because you're a little fatigued by now, and a nap is a good idea for everyone. Multiple hammocks are the best kind. 

You can make a child size hammock under your dining table, between two supports (oh THAT's what porches are for!) or from a ceiling beam. Knot securely and supervise kids, please.



Use it. 
Wraps get smooshier and better with love. Enjoy. 


 

4 comments:

  1. Great post. I see the greatest contents on your blog and I extremely love reading them. best-hammock

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you! I am waiting for my new Oscha wrapr, and I just read on facebook thanit will require break in. After reading this I am not worried anymore.

    ReplyDelete
  3. About the hammock-idea...When the wrapmanufactorer says it can be used up to 15kg, is it really safe to use as a hammock? I mean, will it not tear apart?

    ReplyDelete
  4. About the hammock-idea...When the wrapmanufactorer says it can be used up to 15kg, is it really safe to use as a hammock? I mean, will it not tear apart?

    ReplyDelete